Students commit to college athletics

As the spring season arrives, student-athletes begin to make their decisions on where they are going to commit for college. Seniors such as Alex Bellem, Kenzie Gardner and Devin Gill will be off to play their designated sport next year.

Starting quarterback, Gill, capped off his high school football career in early November. He has played football for four years and is ready to take the sport at the next level. He has decided to play football at Fork Union Military Academy near Charlottesville, Virginia.

“I chose Fork Union because it was the best option for me in terms of a junior college or prep school,” Gill said. I am going for a semester to develop as an athlete and to get ready for high level college football.”
Gill will be attending a prep school to train his body for the next level.

Other professional football players have also gone to small schools to prepare for the next level, such as Lions running back LeGarrette Blount, Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, and Panthers quarterback Cam Newton.

Gill explained how he thinks he will do well once he gets adjusted to the faster pace of the game.
“I know I will continue to prove people wrong, you’ve got to bet on yourself, always,” Gill said.

Senior captain Bellem for the varsity lacrosse team is also continuing his lacrosse career through college. He has played lacrosse here for four years but has also been playing ever since he was a child. Bellem has decided to sign at Palm Beach Atlantic University in Florida, which is D2.

“I decided on PBA because of the coaching staff and the location of the school,” Bellem said. “I also really like the Christian based education.”
Bellem believes that he can be really good at PBA, but is a little nervous to play with such experienced athletes.

“My freshman year will be more of a learning experience as I will probably be getting a little bit of playing time,” Bellem said. “I hope to score a goal my freshman year to prove that I am a good enough player.”

Gardner is the only senior on the girls varsity lacrosse team this year. She has played here for the last four years and will be attending Eastern Mennonite University to play lacrosse next year
. “I decided to sign at EMU because this is their first ever women’s Lacrosse Program,” Gardner said. “I get the opportunity to start for all four years and not having to wait until my junior or senior year to play.”

Gardner also explains how she is slightly nervous to play at EMU.

“Athletes have much more experience at the college level,” Gardner said. “The majority of our new program will be incoming freshman, so we’re going to have a lot of learning to do.”
She believes she will be better than ever as she takes her next step.

“Fighting off from a concussion, I think I will be playing at my highest level. I get to play every position on the field and first and foremost to relax and have fun,” Gardner said. “It will be experience throughout my academic and athletic career.”




Baseball looks for more wins

After proving to have a successful season last year and winning by a whopping 22-3 in the regional quarterfinal, AHS baseball headed to prepare for a new season.

So far, injuries have caused a rough start to the season as the team lost all of their first six games against Herndon, Langley, Justice, Washington-Lee, Thomas Jefferson, and a game in the Atomic Icebreaker tournament.

However, since these tough losses, AHS has started to gain back some confidence and momentum.

They won both of their next two games against Robert E. Lee High School and Park View High School 11-10 and 8-1.

Their record thus far is 2-7.

“So far this year, we have proven to be able to improve and progress by continuing to improve our game and limit the amount of mistake we make on the field,” senior Alex Brennan said.

Then, before their spring break tournament in North Carolina, which will take place on April 15-17, the team will take on each of the other four teams in the Gunston District.

The only game that had been played by the publication date of this article from these four matchups was against West Potomac.

Unfortunately, the team lost to the Wolverines 0-4.

AHS held up against the Wolverines fairly well until the fourth and fifth innings where two runs in each inning were conceded.

However, the results of the games against T.C. Williams, Mount Vernon, and Hayfeld were unavailable by the publication date of this article.

After the spring break tournament, the team will play a series of five games against West Potomac, T.C. Williams, Woodson, Mount Vernon, and Hayfield before heading into postseason.

“Our toughest opponent this season will be West Potomac, but if we do what we need to I think we will stand a good chance,” Brennan.

The games against Mount Vernon, Hayfield, T.C. Williams, and West Potomac will serve as good indicators of how well the Atoms are likely to perform in the district tournament which starts on May 10.

“The team’s overall goal this season is to finish top in the district and hopefully make a good run at regionals,” Brennan said.




Track successful at first invitational

After both advancing to the VHSL State Indoor Track and Field Championships and placing 34th as a team and getting a sprinter to qualify for Nationals, AHS track heads into a new outdoor season.

Their first invitational meet took place at Woodson High School and was the Carolyn Legard Relays.

The meet specialized in relay events such as the 4×200, 4×400, 4×800, and 4×1600 relays.

However, some events are exceptions to this such as the freshmen/sophomore 1600 meter race.

Overall, despite being only the first varsity meet of the season, AHS proved to be successful.

On the girls side, AHS placed 24th out of 32 teams with a total of 5 points scored.

Top ten finishes for AHS girls include a first place finish by Julia Ghiselli in the 1600 meter run, a 4th place finish by the girls distance medley relay (DMR), and a 7th place finish by Kayla Campbell in the High Jump.

On the boys side, the team placed 21st out of 31 total competing teams with 10 points scored.

Top ten finishes for the boys include a 3rd place finish by the 800 meter sprint medley relay with a time of 2:02.21.

In comparison to the performance of other teams in AHS’ district, the team did well even though there is still room for improvement.

On the boys side, AHS beat West Potomac and on the girls side, AHS beat Hayfield.

At this point, the results of the first invitational could indicate improvement since last season where the teams placed third and fourth in the district for the boys and girls respectively.

“Overall, the relays performed very will and exceeded expectations in their first invitational, coach Phil Harris said.”

The team’s next varsity invitational meet was the 2019 PR Northern Virginia Invitational at James Robinson High School.

The meet occurred just a week after the Carolyn Legard Relays and took place at James Robinson High School on April 5-6.

The results of this meet are unavailable by the time this article was published as it had not yet taken place.

The meet features a competition between 30 overall teams from all around Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, New York, Delaware, and New Jersey.

Additionally, the meet served as a benchmark for how much improvement AHS has made in comparison to other teams in their district. This is because every other team in the district competed in the meet.

“So far, the team has been working very hard in practice in terms of endurance and speed workouts which was reflected in their performance,” Harris said.

In addition to the plentiful amount of invtationals that the team has and will be competing in, there are weekday, in-district meets that the team competes in as well.

These meets can help determine the improvements that AHS needs to make leading up to the district finals on May 16.

“Up until postseason, we plan keep doing hard workouts, except we will make them more difficult with less rest,” Harris said.

Although the season is still early, with postseason set to take place in more than a month, the Atoms will undoubtedly have a lot to be excited for in this action packed season.




Lax prepares for spring tournament

The rising excitement for the spring season of boys lacrosse has not been a disappointment thus far, as many fans of AHS lacrosse team has seen a nearly perfect performance in the preseason along with some good wins in the early regular season.

In comparison to last year, where the team lost their first six games, AHS is already off to a better start.

“Currently, we have more than 20 seniors on the team. We benefit from their experience, their maturity, and strong work ethic,” coach Michael Mathis said.

For example, they had strong performances so far in games against Washington-Lee and Mount Vernon, where they pulled off a victory in both games.

With this positive early performance, the sport has caught the eye of many more fans who wish to see the team succeed.

However, AHS has faced both struggle and setback in a variety of ways during the early season.

This was met during their last few games against West Potomac, T.C Williams, and Hayfield, where they lost each game 6-16, 4-12, and 6-11 respectively.

There could have been many reasons as to why the lacrosse team have experienced an early-season slump, but for many of the lacrosse fans it has not been enough to stop showing their support.

However, this is not entirely bad news on the lacrosse team, as after their string of defeats, the team managed to pull a victory against Mount Vernon on March 25 by a score of 19-12.

A very important job as a coach is to see where your team went wrong and see how those weak points impacted the team’s performance during a game.

“We face each day and game once at a time and do nothing unique. [This season], we have the motto “Perfect Simple,” which signifies our hard work to stay focused on the fundamentals,” Mathis said.

But as with any team, the coach also has to find ways to overcome mistakes and improve before the beginning of postseason.

But for some of the optimistic fans of the lacrosse team, their victory against Mt. Vernon is more than enough to say that the team is able to show resilience and come back to win the next game after a tough string of losses.

In order to do so, Mathis has his team review past games in order to identify past mistakes and correct them for future games.

There were specific games in which performance was not as strong which can serve as a learning experience for the team’s upcoming games, such as when they are set to face Falls Church in their first game in the Spring Tournament on April 13.

In the beginning of any sports season, every team understands that some teams will be much harder to beat than others, and for lacrosse those teams

are predicted to be T.C. Williams and West Potomac. So far the two teams have both had the most success in the district.

Even after that early season slump many lacrosse fans are confident that the team will come back from this and become a team that can hopefully succeed in the postseason.

“[Each practice], we encourage the team to have a growth mindset and pick one thing to improve upon each and every day,” Mathis said.




Spring break event calendar

April 13:

– Mason Broadway Showcase @ 8 p.m. ($5) @ GMU Fairfax

– Comedy Festival w/ Tony Woods @ 7:30 to 9 p.m. ($30) in Wash. DC

– Chelsea Handler’s Comedy Tour @ 8 p.m. ($65-$85) in Wash. DC

– Faquier Springs Country Club Community Market @ 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (FREE) in Warrenton

– Annual Festival of the Arts @ 5 p.m. (FREE) in Arlington

– National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade @ 10 a.m. (FREE) in Wash. DC

April 14:

– Washington Auto Show @ 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ($12-$42) at Convention Center

– South Asian Exhibition @ 6 to 10 p.m. (FREE) at the Waterford

– Sip and Sew Pop Up: Pencil Skirts @ 1 to 3 p.m. in Wash. DC

– Cupcakes and Candles @ 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. ($50) in Arlington

– Active for Autism 5k @ 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. ($35) at George Wash. MS

– Baseball Game; Pirates vs. Nats @ 1:35 p.m. ($11-$415) at National Park

April 15:

– Annual Peep Show @ 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (FREE) at Westminster, MD

– Tour of Udvar Hazy Museum @ 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. (FREE) at Air and Space Museum

– Boys Lacrosse Tournament @ 8 a.m. ($10) at Falls Church

– Bad Suns Concert @ 9:30 p.m. ($43) in Wash. DC

– Distance Over Time Tour @ 8 p.m. ($62+) at Warner Theatre

– NEA Jazz Masters Tribute Concert @ 8 p.m. (FREE) at the JFK Center

April 16:

– Annual Peep Show @ 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (FREE) at Westminster, MD

– Boys Lacrosse Tournament @ 8 a.m. ($10) at Falls Church

– Baseball Game: Giants vs. Nats @7:05 ($9-$151) at Nationals Park

– UMCP VSA Lunar Lanterns @ 7 to 10 p.m. at College Park, MD

– Sugar Mountain: Celebrating Neil Young @ 7:30 p.m. at Jammin Java

– Cohesity Unstoppable Tour @10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (FREE) in Herndon

April 17:

– Cars and Ice Cream Meet @7 to 9 p.m. (FREE) in Gaithersburg, MD

– Yoga in Luce @ 6 to 7 p.m. ($10) at the Smithsonian Art Museum

– Midweek Movies: Fences @ 6 to 8:30 p.m. (FREE) at Fairfax County Public Library

– DMV Springfest @ 8 p.m. ($54+) at the Fillmore Silver Spring, MD

– Georgetown University Farmers Market @ 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (FREE) @Georgetown University

– Annual Peep Show @ 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (FREE) at Westminster, MD

April 18:

– Kenny Chesney: Song for the Saints Tour @ 7 p.m. ($125-$499) at The Anthem in DC

– Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad @ 7:30 p.m. ($74-$387) at the Hamilton, DC

– Carrie the Musical @ 8 p.m. ($10) at the Katzen Arts Center

– Shen Yun Performing Arts @ 7:30 p.m. ($137+) at JFK Center

– Coding Skills @ 5:30 to 6 p.m. (FREE) in McLean

– Queens of Egypt @ 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ($12) at National Geographic Headquarters, DC

April 19:

– Murder Mystery Dinner @ 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. ($60-$75) at Maggiano’s Little Italy, DC

– Interstate BBQ Festival @ 5 p.m. ($5-$45) at Wash. County Agricultural Education Center

– Flower Power Art @ 6:30 to 11 p.m. ($10) in Wash. DC

– Cherry Blossom Harbour Cruise @ 1 p.m. and 4:45 p.m. ($17.50) in Wash. DC

– ICNA MAS Annual Convention @ 4 p.m. ($55 for 3 days)

– General Shaw’s Chicken Comedy Showcase @ 7:30 p.m. ($15) at Shaw’s Tavern, DC

April 20:

– Into the Woods @ 2:00 p.m. ($71+) at Ford’s Theatre

– Cherry Blossom Harbour Cruise @ 1 and 4:30 p.m. ($17.50) in Wash. DC

– Tailgating Spring Horse Races @ 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ($20) in Middleburg, VA

– Feed the Homeless @ 12 to 1 p.m. (FREE) at Franklin Square, DC

– Rob Schneider @ 7:30 p.m. ($68+) at Birchmere Music Hall, Alexandria

– Yoga with APO @ 6 p.m. (@25) Dupont Underground, DC

April 21:

– Easter 5k & 10k @ 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. ($30 & $45) in Fredericksburg

– Dabke Class @ 6 to 9 p.m. (FREE) at Bey Restaurant and Lounge

– Washington DC International Music Festival @ 8 p.m. ($66+) at JFK Center for the Performing Arts

– Easter Brunch with Lincoln @ 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ($55) at Lincoln Restaurant, DC

-Easter Sunday Brunch & Egg Hunt @ 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. ($98) in Middleton, VA

– Easter on Parade @ 1 to 5 p.m. (FREE) in Richmond




Girls soccer improves from last year

It’s been a month since the girls varsity soccer season began, and players are already seeing improvement from last year.

“I feel like our season is definitely going better than last year, and we feel like more of an improved team,” sophomore Jayden Joya said. “I’m excited for what is to come. We have been working really hard and I would like to make it further into regionals than last year.”

So far the girls have a record of 2-4. They’ve faced Edison, Wakefield, Lee, Springfield, Justice and West Potomac. Out of all six games they’ve had two solid wins and four losses. Most of which where of 1-goal differences.

On games that haven’t gone so well our biggest issues include not stepping to the ball while defending as well as not sticking with our marks,” sophomore Madison Cruz said.

The players expressed what they can work on.

“I think we need to work on having a positive attitude,” Joya said, “I feel like the team can work on our mindset game days. I also believe that we could really use work on being able to bond as a team both on and off field.”

The girls have definitely improved from last year’s first six games, in which the girls had five losses and tied one game.

“I think last year we bonded ever as a team, however, we’re only one month into the season, so I have no doubt that as time goes by we’ll be able to bond even more,” said Joya.

The girls will continues to give it their all at practices and games. Their next game will be home against Hayfield High School on Monday April 8, at 7:15 p.m.




Girls and boys tennis produce different results

The girls tennis team recently won its game 5-4 against Mt. Vernon on March 28. They have also been victorious against Forest Park and Falls Church as well.

“I think that through all the games we have won, our hard work has been in display,” senior Araceli Cabrera-Ortuno said. “We have been practicing every day, not only getting better individually but as a team.”

The girls have managed to have a satisfying record of 3-3.

Head coach Hassan Mims of the girls team believes that one of their weakness is that the lineup doesn’t have much experience. He also believes that their strength is that the girls have heart.

“Our only weakness is half of our starting lineup is new – they did not start during previous seasons,” said Mims. “But they compensate for their lack of experience and being extremely competitive. Our biggest strengths are mental toughness and team chemistry.”

The boys tennis team won their game with a score of 5-4 against Mt. Vernon on March 28. Unfortunately for the boys this was their first game they won.

“Last game our team had a very good coordination while playing doubles and we made use of the drills we had in practice,” senior Kidus Asmare Ayele said.

This game they won could be a turn of events for the team. The team’s record so far is 1-5.

Lucky enough the boys still have time to improve for the district tournament.




Softball looks to upgrade

The girls varsity softball team has had a very rough season so far. With only 2-5, it was uncertain that they would beat West Potomac this past week.

Their only wins have been against Falls Church and Thomas Jefferson, two relatively easy competitorsAnd their other games, for that matter, have not been as successful. On March 14, they lost 14-3 against Stonewall Jackson, than lost 13-14 against Fairfax, 18-5 against Woodson, 18-0 against Edison, and their most recent game on April 2, they were defeated by West Potomac 12-1.

“West Potomac was a very good competitor,” freshman Holly Walridge said. “Their outfield was very good and that made it difficult to score.”

Although their results have been disappointing, it is very important to consider that the team has versed some tough components who have very strong players and have still been able to remain competitive.

“A lot of the teams we play have a lot of really good players,” Waldridge said. “Hopefully with more practice we can turn the season around.”

It was been a bumpy start to their season and all we can do is hope that they worker harder in practice so they can get those results, improve their record, and be prepared for the district tournament at the end of the season.




Boys looks to find stability

It had seemed that boys varsity soccer team was going to turn around its season as the boys won two games in a row against Robert E. Lee and West Springfield.

This seemed to be the case, but on March 26 the boys played Justice. This game didn’t go to well for the Atoms as they lost 5-0.

Head coach Tejas Patel believes that the main factor that the games that didn’t go as planned was that the team hadn’t played enough time together.

“The losses have been due to pre-season jitters and not having the chance to really play with each other,” Patel said. “With more experience together, the team will continue to get stronger.”

Despite the boys losing by a large margin, they did not let this game get into their head and were heading to their next game open-minded.

The boys played West Potomac and give it their all as they knew this was their first conference game. The Atoms won the game 3-2.

“Against West Potomac, which was our first conference game, we went out knowing we had to play our best and we did,” midfielder Andy Hernandez said. “We started off strong but got lucky a couple times. We had a couple mistakes but we made up for them. It was a great team effort.”

The boys played T.C. Williams and did not perform too well as they lost 6-1. The team doesn’t believe they should’ve lost that bad.

“They don’t deserve to beat us by such a big margin,” sophomore Justin Scott said. “They weren’t better than us the team just didn’t perform like we were suppose.”

The team is improving, but is looking to find consistency.




Renovation nears endgame

Earlier in the year, it was believed that the bleachers located on the home side of Bolding Stadium would not be completed until after the spring sports season. However, the bleachers are on track to be finished earlier than once thought.
Over the past few days, the construction team has made a lot of progress.
“It might be done a little bit sooner than we thought,” Director of Student Services John Ellenberger said. “But I have not gotten the official word from the county.”
It is possible that the bleachers will be done before the spring season is over. The seating for the new bleachers will be reduced, but not by much. Ellenberger also asked the county to increase the amount of space between the bleachers and the fence surrounding the football field.
“I asked [the county] to give us another foot of space for the walkway. With that extra room, we might lose one more row of seating, but I don’t think that will really have an impact,” Ellenberger said.
The press box will also be upgraded with a possibility of heat and AC.
In addition to the renovated bleachers, upgraded restrooms will also be installed. Ellenberger received an e-mail from the county stating that AHS would be getting outdoor restrooms for the stadium. According to Fairfax County government code, there has to be a certain amount of outdoor bathrooms to the seating capacity.
As of now, Ellenberger has not received any word of what the bathrooms will look like or where exactly they will be.
As the renovations progress, it will become more apparent when the construction team will be done. The bleachers will be complete for the fall season with minimal loss to the size.




Students commit to college athletics

As the spring season arrives, student athletes begin to make their decisions on where they are going to commit for college. Seniors such as Alex Bellem, Kenzie Gardner and Devin Gill will be off to play their designated sport next year.
Starting quarterback, Gill, capped off his high school football career in early November. He has played football for four years and is ready to take the sport the next level. He has decided to play football at Fork Union Military Academy near Charlottesville, Virginia.
“I chose Fork Union because it was the best option for me in terms of a junior college or prep school,” Gill said. “I am going for a semester to develop as an athlete and to get ready for high level college football.”
Gill will be attending a prep school to train his body for the next level.
Other professional football players have also gone to small schools to prepare for the next level, such as Lions running back LeGarrette Blount, Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, and Panthers quarterback Cam Newton.
Gill explained how he thinks he will do well once he gets adjusted to the faster pace of the game.
“I know I will continue to prove people wrong, you’ve got to bet on yourself, always,” Gill said.
Senior captain Bellem for the varsity lacrosse team is also continuing his lacrosse career through college. He has played lacrosse here for four years, but has also been playing ever since he was a child. Bellem has decided to sign at Palm Beach Atlantic University in Florida, which is D2 and will be receiving a full ride scholarship from the University.
“I decided on PBA because of the coaching staff and the location of the school,” Bellem said. “I also really like the Christian based education.”
Bellem believes that he can be really good at PBA, but is a little nervous to play with such experienced athletes.
“My freshman year will be more of a learning experience as I will probably be getting a little bit of playing time,” Bellem said. “I hope to score a goal my freshman year to prove that I am a good enough player.”
Gardner is the only senior on the girls varsity lacrosse team this year. She has played here for the last four years and will be attending Eastern Mennonite University to play lacrosse next year
“I decided to sign at EMU because this is their first ever women’s Lacrosse Program,” Gardner said. “I get the opportunity to start for all four years and not having to wait until my junior or senior year to play.”
Gardner also explains how she is slightly nervous to play at EMU.
“Athletes have much more experience at the college level,” Gardner said. “The majority of our new program will be incoming freshman, so we’re going to have a lot of learning to do.”
She believes she will be better than ever as she takes her next step.
“Fighting off from a concussion, I think I will be playing at my highest level. I get to play every position on the field and first and foremost to relax and have fun,” Gardner said. “It will be experience throughout my academic and athletic career.”




Athletic trainers heal injured

In high school, athletic trainers play an important role in athletics, as they are professionally trained health care personnel who work to diagnose, treat and prevent injuries. At AHS, there are two athletic trainers: Kathleen Ayers and Ryan Hughes.
Hughes is the head athletic trainer and he covers the afternoon and evening shift, including all of the home games throughout the year. Hughes’ daily duties include completing paperwork and getting the athletic training room set up. He makes sure it is ready for the end of the day so that students with injuries can come in and receive medical attention.
Freshman Ishaat Hannan was injured in a game and sought assistance from the trainers.
“Athletic trainers are important because they’ll provide you with the care you need when a doctor isn’t available,” Hannan said.
Hughes helps students by diagnosing and treating their injuries and also by demonstrating how students should complete rehabilitation.
In addition to Hughes, Ayers also works diligently to ensure the wellbeing of all the students, especially those who get injured.
The process for evaluating student injuries is unique for each particular instance.
“When a student gets injured, they come and see us in the athletic training room, where they are evaluated in order to determine what exactly is wrong with them,” Hughes said. “Then we sort out what types of treatments will best suit his injury.”
“It’s better to have someone be able to check your injury rather than having no one check it at the moment,” Hannan said.
Both Ayers and Hughes also find physicians and specialists who will work to help the athletes with their specific injuries. Equally important, athletic trainers work with the entire athletic department. Including coaches, to adhere by safety protocols, educate both students and teachers on certain health issues, such as weight loss and weight gain, which can significantly affect the performance of athletes.
Athletic trainers provide student-athletes with holistic medical care, meaning that the trainers apply an approach that takes into account both the internal and external factors in order to diagnose a student.
As the number of students who participate in sports increases, the importance of athletic trainers in high school in general, has drastically increased. Furthermore, the fact that athletic trainers provide immediate medical attention is crucial, especially in cases where long-term implications, if not properly followed, may have severe repercussions for the athlete.
“Athletic trainers are important because they help us and they give us good rehabilitation to recover,” senior Diana Silva said. “They’re always here when we need them, and they also give us physical therapy equipment to use so that we can increase faster.”
The process for evaluating student injuries is unique for each particular instance.
According to the National Athletic Trainers’ Association, 1.6 – 3.8 million concussions occur in both high school and colleges across America.
“The most common injury that students get, in the entire campus is probably the lateral ankle sprain, which we immediately treat with ice in order to reduce and control both the swelling and inflammation,” Hughes said. “The next day, we will start up by introducing some range-of-motion and light exercises to increase blood flow to help them recover from their injuries so they can get back to playing in practices and games sooner.”
Throughout his experience, Hughes has seen some severe injuries occur.
“I have seen many severe neck and spinal injuries that happened during football games. I have also seen a couple of broken lower legs from rugby,” Hughes said. “These injuries require a 911 call, as they have to cared for immediately.”
Practicing proper technique, ensuring to warm up, cool down, and stretch, and staying hydrated are all known to reduce the risk of getting injured for athletes everywhere. Stretching, warming up, and cooling down are exceedingly important due to the fact that they help to loosen up the muscles and prepare them for play.
Both static and dynamic stretching are encouraged and implemented. Static stretches work to improve the end-range movement of a muscle and dynamic stretches help improve mobility through a range-of-motion manner.
In addition, sleep is also crucial to preventing injury, as a lack of sleep and muscle fatigue increase an athlete’s susceptibility to injury. Furthermore, trainers encourage athletes to hydrate before and after practice, as well as promote a healthy, well-balanced diet.
Coaches also recommend the use of proper equipment, such as helmets, pads, and shoes, as well as the implementation of proper technique during practices and games.