The problem with Sarahah

Anonymous app could be a forum for bullies

Yabi Bereket, Lifestyles Editor

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As of recent, the highly used app Sarahah, has been climbing its way up to the top of the Apple Store and Google Play Store charts, and the hype will not be dying down anytime soon.As of recent, the highly used app Sarahah, has been climbing its way up to the top of the Apple Store and Google Play Store charts, and the hype will not be dying down anytime soon.The application was created by Zain al-Abidin Tawfiq, who developed the app with the intent of giving people the opportunity of expressing their true feelings and honesty towards anyone–anonymously. The word “sarahah” in arabic means “to be frank,” hence the app’s name.The way it works is that after you create an account, you could leave an anonymous message to someone, or receive one, with the expectation to give a response back to that person.Considering that the app is mostly used by preteens and teenagers, is the idea of anonymously messaging people your true feelings such a good thing or is it just another source of online bullying?We have all heard the same discourse repeated tirelessly from our teachers, starting from the tender age of an elementary school student about “don’t be a bully, don’t be a bystander.” Yet frankly, students who are labeled as a bully, never seem to change.And with this new app, this gives not only bullies, who are not afraid in the first place to speak what is truly on their minds, but also gives presumpted ordinary people, who put up their facade in school, an opportunity to ruin someone’s day.This app really seems frustrating, because as exciting as it may seem to have someone speak honestly towards you, about you, wouldn’t it be better to just know who it is? Using an anonymous messaging app like this could lead to more drama and heat, rather than just confronting someone face to face. There is also an endless string of anonymous messaging apps such as Whisper, Ask.fm, After School (which is more recent),Yik Yak and now Sarahah. All of these apps contain the same concept, and while each of them were probably developed with positive traits and such, they have all been abused into another platform for starting drama or online bullying.It seems as though Tawfiq probably didn’t realize the negative outcome that would be produced through this app, even after trying to take early precautions to prevent that.“I think the app has interesting qualities to it, I like to know what people think about me, but it’s annoying to not know who’s saying what”, junior Hemen Besufekad said. “But getting a compliment from someone is nice and makes me feel good.”Spreading positivity should be a standard for all people, and using this app for that will help people get there. Hopefully, a majority of people who do use the controversial app would use it to help someone’s day, and not hinder it.

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