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Outbreak of protests show the power of teens

Sophomore+Fathima+Samsudeen+protests+gun+violence+at+Justice+High+School+on+Feb.+21.+Many+students+left+classes+to+participate.+These+protests+came+after++the+Stoneman+Douglas+High+School+shooting+in+Parkland%2C+Florida.+
Sophomore Fathima Samsudeen protests gun violence at Justice High School on Feb. 21. Many students left classes to participate. These protests came after  the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Sophomore Fathima Samsudeen protests gun violence at Justice High School on Feb. 21. Many students left classes to participate. These protests came after the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Sophomore Fathima Samsudeen protests gun violence at Justice High School on Feb. 21. Many students left classes to participate. These protests came after the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida.

Ruth Mekonnen, Editorials Editor

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As junior Sherin Kellermann-Nowrouz marched during the Unite the Right rally at Charlottesville on Aug. 12 2017, she couldn’t help but feel an overwhelming sensation.
“I was traumatized. My heart was beating out of my chest as I saw the alt-right white supremacists walking around,” Kellerman-Nowrouz said.
But as she continued to stand tall against them and feel the support of the other protesters around her, she couldn’t help but feel confident. “The fear fades away and turns into passion,” Kellerman-Nowrouz said.
When a mass group of students took to the streets to protest against gun violence after the Parkland shooting, many people were surprised and even astounded at the sight of students speaking up and actually getting things accomplished. Just like Kellerman Nowrouz, these students were beginning to demand change.
Gun violence has been an ongoing issue. Tragedy after tragedy, it has become something normal that no one was able to compromise or find a solution to.
Even after the horrific Sandy Hook shooting and the Las Vegas shooting, the country remained at a stalemate. So what is the thing that made the Parkland shooting different? The answer is student activism.
Unlike the other victims, the Parkland students telling their own story, and using their own platform to spread awareness and fight to make sure that this never happens again.
As opposed to adults whose views are often misguided by political agendas, it is easy to have compassion for them.
They aren’t speaking against anyone or anything, in fact, they are only speaking up for those silenced.
They are able to easily resonate with the public. The students from Parkland are able to reach the nation.
Students from all over the country joined together to stage walkouts, marches and even shutdowns.
They were even able to garner support through social media going as far as to being able to have a sit-down with the President.
They are able to make change at a time where people feel silenced. But this is nothing new. Students have always been at the forefront of change throughout history.
“I feel the need to continuously speak out and protest against injustices because it’s just my personality,” said Kellermann-Nowrouz. “Whether it’s a peer at school or someone I don’t even know, if there’s an injustice going on I will always speak out and defend those who need it. If I don’t then who will.”
Many teens feel this way. Although it may not feel like it, every voice does count. The Parkland students wouldn’t have been able to accomplish all that they have without other students, just like them, speaking out.
As seen by the lack of student participation during the walkout proceeding the Parkland shooting, it was saddening to know that our school wasn’t representing the very thing that makes it so great.
No matter your political views, we should be able to band together to speak up against violence.
We need to represent our views and demand change. After all, we are the next to lead and problems will get tougher and harder to solve.
“I address any student reading this to take a part in some form of activism. Do something. You are the next wave of change the world will see especially since you live in one of the only countries that allows you to protest freely,” said Kellermann-Nowrouz.

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We are the voice